Topic Study Group 23:
The role of history of mathematics in mathematics education
A303 and A304 Rooms
  • Abdallah El Idrissi (Morocco)
    a_elidrissi@hotmail.com
  • Antonio Miguel (Brazil)
    Campinas State University (UNICAMP)
    miguel@unicamp.br
  • Fulvia Furinghetti (Italy)
    Dipartimento de Matematica dell' Università
    Via Dodecaneso 35 - 16146 - Genova
    furinghetti@dima.unige.it
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Team members:
  • Alejandro Garciadiego (Mexico)
    gardan@servidor.unam.mx and alejandro.garciadiego@gmail.com
  • Evelyne Barbin (France)
    evelyne.barbin@wanadoo.fr and evelyne.barbin@univ-nantes.fr
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1. Aims and Focus

Nowadays, after the meaningful advance of the dialogue between history and mathematics education in different parts of the world and several aspects, it is possible to distinguish among at least three autonomous research fields led by this debate: the history of mathematics; the history of mathematics education and the history in mathematics education. The focus of the TSG 23 is just about the third of these fields, although the achievements in the first and second of these research fields have been conditioning the development of the specific debate in TSG 23. Thus, there is no doubt that some of the main difficulties for the establishment of dialogues between history and mathematics education, in all of its levels and aspects, are not just the access to historical sources, but also the production of new and more enlightening histories of mathematics and mathematics education. The ways how these dialogues can be established, especially from an educational perspective, are another difficulty. However, some processes and tools – as the edition of original sources and the information and communication technologies (ICT) – seem to contribute partially to attenuate the first difficulty. Concerning the second, it is through researches, experiments, meetings and debates that these dialogues can become relevant and efficient, chiefly to school practices involving mathematics.
In fact, the history of mathematics and mathematics education, as well as their use in all levels and aspects of mathematics education, is becoming extensive everywhere in the world. All the meetings, conferences, summer schools, seminars devoted to mathematics education offer opportunities to discuss and debate this topic.
Several aims are pointed to the establishment of dialogues between history and mathematics education, and many ways are used to reach these aims. Among them, we can mention:

• to humanize the mathematics education conceiving it as a historical, social and cultural production, as well as a set of particular social activities which are related to other social activities;

• to make student understand the meanings of aims, values, concepts, methods and proofs in different social practices involving mathematics;

• To develop the learners’ citizenship feeling, problematizing school mathematical social practices in a historico-critical point of view and maintaining an open attitude towards the study of mathematical practices in different geopolitical, institutional and chronological contexts.

To reach these aims, researchers and teachers pursue different ways and try to give theoretical and epistemological foundations to the use of the history of mathematics and mathematical education in their teaching. In spite of these efforts, several issues are still open and deserve to be discussed. Among them:

• What kind of proposals, strategies and pedagogical practices have been relevant and useful to the establishment of fruitful dialogues between history and mathematics education in different countries, contexts and levels, chiefly in the mathematics teachers’ education?

• How and why the integration of history of mathematics in mathematics education has been differently valued in the school curricula of several countries and regions?

• On what kind of political, philosophical, sociological, anthropological, psychological and linguistic bases and theoretical perspectives the integration of history in mathematics education has been conceived?

• To what extent the production of new and more enlightening histories of mathematics and mathematics education could contribute and promote new ways of establishing dialogues between history and mathematics education?

• Which place does the history of mathematics occupy in mathematics textbooks of different countries?

• Which place do the historical mathematics textbooks occupy in the mathematics’ teachers education in different countries?

• How the ICT and Internet can help to promote dialogues between history and school mathematics education?

• Which non standards media can be used to promote dialogues between history and school mathematics education?
In the sessions devoted to this TSG 23, we hope to gather different actors of mathematics education, researchers, historians, teachers, … to discuss and shed light on these questions.

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2. Call for Papers

All contributions that focus on the topics and issues mentioned above are welcome. They could be specific to a school level, a mathematical and/or historical content, a mathematical and/or pedagogical practice, a cultural context and/or mathematics teachers’ education. However, considering the framework and the objectives of this meeting, such contributions should have a global approach and be built upon recent results in that field.

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3. Contributions

In accordance with the rules of the ICMI, there will be two kinds of contributions: oral contributions and written contributions.

Oral contributions: Some of the contributions may be more suitable for verbal presentation on the spot. However, given the limited time available and, depending on the number of accepted submissions, only a relatively small number of contributions are expected to be of this kind. No more than fifteen minutes will be allowed for such contributions (See Procedures and Deadlines).

Written contributions: Some contributions may be more suitable through papers. This means that a full text will be available; either as a hard copy to be distributed to the participants on the spot, or as an electronic file on the web. Also, depending on the number of submitted and accepted contributions, occasion for contributors to discuss their papers will be provided for (See Procedures and Deadlines).

In any case, authors are asked to provide an electronic version of their participations (extended abstract or full text) to be put on the website. Additional and useful documents can be also submitted. Clearly, this has great advantages: documents will be available well before the Congress and there is no need to make copies for an unspecified number of participants. Therefore, providing documents on the web is most welcome and will greatly help participants to follow the oral presentation in this admittedly short time. Moreover, this will permit people, who can not attend the Congress or be enrolled in other activities during the Congress, to be widely informed on our TSG activities.

In fact, the success of our TSG will rely on the enthusiastic participation and contribution of all who care for joining us and working together in this international meeting.

NB 1. It is the authors’ responsibility to produce hard copies for distribution among the participants.

NB 2. The TSG23 aims at fostering discussion on the basis over short presentations on recent ideas and results. Therefore, authors who think that their presentations would take too much time or which purposes did not meet the “aims and focus” of this TSG are advised to get information about other related events, mainly:

- ICME11 HPM Satellite Meeting, to be held at Mexico City (Mexico) in 14-18 July 2008, immediately after the ICME-11. More information can be found in http://www.red-cimates.org.mx/HPM2008.htm

- TSG38 – ICME11: The History of the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

NB 3. Later, the organizers will do their best to ensure a hard copy of the proceedings of the TSG contributions. This can be done in a special edition of a suitable magazine or independently. Additional reviewing may be necessary for such work.

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4. Selection Criteria

The contribution must be:

• relevant to the development of the “aims and focus” of TSG-23;

• clear and concise in its purposes;

• consistent and objective in its argumentation;

• original and built upon recent researches.

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5. Procedures and Deadlines

January 20, 2008: Electronic-form submission of an extended abstract of up to 2000 words (not including references, pictures, tables etc.) or a full text with an ordinary/ small abstract. Abstracts and full texts will be reviewed by the members of the Organizing Team.

February 29, 2008: Notification of acceptance or not and whether presentation is oral, or by distribution. Eventual adjustments may be suggested.

March 16, 2008: Submission of full texts for written contribution and any documents to support oral contribution.

April 20, 2008: The final programme is announced on the web.

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6. Practical Information

Contact: For further information, please contact the Team Chairs. In particular, abstracts, full texts and documents should be addressed to any one of the Team Chairs.

Submission of documents: Authors are kindly requested to submit their abstract, full paper, or any other relevant document, by e-mail prepared using Adobe Acrobat.

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7. Programme

Monday 7th
Chair Abdellah El Idrissi

13-13:35 Invited talk: Constantinos TZANAKIS (Greece):
“Contributions from the study of the history of statistics in understanding students’ difficulties for the comprehension of the Variance”

13:35-14 – Adriana Cesar de MATTOS (Brazil):
“The process of recognition in the history of mathematics”

Wednesday 9th
Chair Alejandro GARCIADIEGO

12:30 – 13:05 Invited talk: Louis CHARBONNEAU (Canada):
“Astronomical and mathematical instruments as pedagogical tools”

13:05 – 13:30 Snezana LAWRENCE (UK):
“History of mathematics making its way through the teacher networks: professional learning environment and the history of mathematics in mathematics curriculum”

13:30 – 14:00 Liliana MILEVICICH & Alejandro LOIS (Argentina):
“The teaching and learning of integral calculus from a historical perspective”

Friday 11th
Chair Constantinos TZANAKIS

12:30 – 13:05 Invited talk: Uffe Thomas JANKVIST (Denmark):
“On Empirical Research in the Field of Using History in Mathematics Education”

13:05 – 13:30 Lenni HAAPASALO (Finland):
“On instrumental genesis within procedural and conceptual thinking”

Saturday 12th
Chair Fulvia Furinghetti

12 – 12:30 Invited Talk: Bjørn SMESTAD (Norway):
“Student projects on history of mathematics”

12:30 – 13:15 General discussion

13:15 – 13:30 Invited of Honor: Ubiratan D’AMBROSIO (Brazil)
Synthesis

Closure

LIST OF ALL CONTRIBUTORS OF THE TSG23

INVITED SPEAKERS

Louis CHARBONNEAU: “Astronomical and mathematical instruments as pedagogical tools”

Bjørn SMESTAD: “Student projects on history of mathematics”

Constantinos TZANAKIS: “Contributions from the study of the history of statistics in understanding students’ difficulties for the comprehension of the Variance”

Uffe Thomas JANKVIST: “The role of the history of mathematics in mathematics education”

Ubiratan D’AMBROSIO: Synthesis

ORAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Adriana Cesar de MATTOS: “The process of recognition in the history of mathematics”

Lenni HAAPASALO “On instrumental genesis within procedural and conceptual thinking”

Snezana LAWRENCE: “History of mathematics making its way through the teacher networks: professional learning environment and the history of mathematics in mathematics curriculum”

Liliana MILEVICICH & Alejandro LOIS: “The teaching and learning of integral calculus from a historical perspective”

WRITTEN CONTRIBUTIONS

Diego Pareja HEREDIA: “The Huge Gap between Math Education and the front of Mathematics”

Slim MRABET: “The development of Thales theorem throughout history”

Gladys Denise WIELEWSKI: “Two cultures of mathematics in historical and educational perspective”

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